ge to phase out compact fluorescent light bulbsge to phase out compact fluorescent light bulbsge to phase out compact fluorescent light bulbs

by:EME LIGHTING     2020-06-12
Just a few years ago, compact fluorescent lamps were the most important.
Offering options for customers looking for cheap energy
Efficient replacement of standard incandescent bulb.
But as the light quality of LEDs improves and the cost drops, manufacturers and retailers are starting to work in this direction.
Now General Electric, the industrial giant, is saying goodbye to the CFL ).
The company said Monday it will stop producing and selling light bulbs in the United States by the end of this year.
\"It\'s time to transition from CFL to LED,\" said John Strainic, chief operating officer for GE Lighting consumption and traditional lighting.
\"It\'s overwhelming that consumers have a socket at home with too many options.
This will help simplify this.
The first big energy source is compact fluorescent lamps.
In the United States and several other countries, standard incandescent lamps are no longer in line with government energy efficiency standards, but rather energy-efficient alternatives.
But consumers complain about the poor quality of light on early models.
They are also slow to heat up, difficult to darken and contain trace amounts of mercury.
The Led is more expensive and the bulb usually costs $30, but supporters of the technology say they offer better light quality.
Prices have fallen steadily, with the price of basic bulbs well below $5 last year, in part because government regulations have made it easier for them to get generous discounts.
As a result, customers have been migrating to LEDs.
Strainic said that led accounted for about the market in 2014.
According to the National Association of electrical manufacturers, led reached 237 of bulb shipments in the third quarter of last year, an increase over the same period in 2014.
The association reported that halogen lamps were dominant in standard bulb shipments, accounting for almost half of the total, followed by CFLs, about 27, with a declining share.
Retailers have also been away from CFLs, and under the regulations proposed next year, CFLs will be harder to get an Energy Star rating, Strainic said.
Including giants like Sam\'s Club and Wal-Mart, they have fewer CFL options on the shelves, he said.
Ikea gave up CFLs and started with only led last year.
At present, GE\'s move only applies to the United States.
In other places, especially in Europe, Mexico and the rest of Latin America, CFLs are more widely accepted.
In the New York Times just a few years ago, compact fluorescent lamps were the most popular.
Offering options for customers looking for cheap energy
Efficient replacement of standard incandescent bulb.
But as the light quality of LEDs improves and the cost drops, manufacturers and retailers are starting to work in this direction.
Now General Electric, the industrial giant, is saying goodbye to the CFL ).
The company said Monday it will stop producing and selling light bulbs in the United States by the end of this year.
\"It\'s time to transition from CFL to LED,\" said John Strainic, chief operating officer for GE Lighting consumption and traditional lighting.
\"It\'s overwhelming that consumers have a socket at home with too many options.
This will help simplify this.
The first big energy source is compact fluorescent lamps.
In the United States and several other countries, standard incandescent lamps are no longer in line with government energy efficiency standards, but rather energy-efficient alternatives.
But consumers complain about the poor quality of light on early models.
They are also slow to heat up, difficult to darken and contain trace amounts of mercury.
The Led is more expensive and the bulb usually costs $30, but supporters of the technology say they offer better light quality.
Prices have fallen steadily, with the price of basic bulbs well below $5 last year, in part because government regulations have made it easier for them to get generous discounts.
As a result, customers have been migrating to LEDs.
Strainic said that led accounted for about the market in 2014.
According to the National Association of electrical manufacturers, led reached 237 of bulb shipments in the third quarter of last year, an increase over the same period in 2014.
The association reported that halogen lamps were dominant in standard bulb shipments, accounting for almost half of the total, followed by CFLs, about 27, with a declining share.
Retailers have also been away from CFLs, and under the regulations proposed next year, CFLs will be harder to get an Energy Star rating, Strainic said.
Including giants like Sam\'s Club and Wal-Mart, they have fewer CFL options on the shelves, he said.
Ikea gave up CFLs and started with only led last year.
At present, GE\'s move only applies to the United States.
In other places, especially in Europe, Mexico and the rest of Latin America, CFLs are more widely accepted.
In the New York Times just a few years ago, compact fluorescent lamps were the most popular.
Offering options for customers looking for cheap energy
Efficient replacement of standard incandescent bulb.
But as the light quality of LEDs improves and the cost drops, manufacturers and retailers are starting to work in this direction.
Now General Electric, the industrial giant, is saying goodbye to the CFL ).
The company said Monday it will stop producing and selling light bulbs in the United States by the end of this year.
\"It\'s time to transition from CFL to LED,\" said John Strainic, chief operating officer for GE Lighting consumption and traditional lighting.
\"It\'s overwhelming that consumers have a socket at home with too many options.
This will help simplify this.
The first big energy source is compact fluorescent lamps.
In the United States and several other countries, standard incandescent lamps are no longer in line with government energy efficiency standards, but rather energy-efficient alternatives.
But consumers complain about the poor quality of light on early models.
They are also slow to heat up, difficult to darken and contain trace amounts of mercury.
The Led is more expensive and the bulb usually costs $30, but supporters of the technology say they offer better light quality.
Prices have fallen steadily, with the price of basic bulbs well below $5 last year, in part because government regulations have made it easier for them to get generous discounts.
As a result, customers have been migrating to LEDs.
Strainic said that led accounted for about the market in 2014.
According to the National Association of electrical manufacturers, led reached 237 of bulb shipments in the third quarter of last year, an increase over the same period in 2014.
The association reported that halogen lamps were dominant in standard bulb shipments, accounting for almost half of the total, followed by CFLs, about 27, with a declining share.
Retailers have also been away from CFLs, and under the regulations proposed next year, CFLs will be harder to get an Energy Star rating, Strainic said.
Including giants like Sam\'s Club and Wal-Mart, they have fewer CFL options on the shelves, he said.
Ikea gave up CFLs and started with only led last year.
At present, GE\'s move only applies to the United States.
In other places, especially in Europe, Mexico and the rest of Latin America, CFLs are more widely accepted.
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